sorayachemaly:

unwinona:

nocakeno:

campdracula5eva:

sorayachemaly:

Even little kids have a wage gap

  • Boys, on average, spend two fewer hours doing household chores per week than girls do (they play two hours more).
  • If they live in households where children are compensated for doing chores, boys make and save more money.
  • A 2009 study conducted by University of Michigan economists found a two-hour gender disparity in responsibilities per week in a study of 3,000 kids.
  • 75 percent of girls had chores, while just 65 percent of boys do
  • This disparity in chores and free time continues into adulthood all over the world. According to the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), men “report spending more time in activities counted as leisure than women. Gender differences in leisure time are wide across OECD countries.”
  • Year after year, studies repeatedly confirm these patterns.
  • The problems women face with unequal pay and housework duties actually start in childhood.
  • The fact that boys’ chores appear to be more profitable makes the childhood chore gap even more disturbing. Turns out, parents tend to value the work that boys do more.
  • Gender stereotypes dictate these patterns.
  • men who grow up with sisters do less housework than their spouses and are also significantly more socially conservative.

Just had to bold that bottom point there because of the amount of misogynists who claim that because they have women in their family, they can’t POSSIBLY be sexist ever.

oh my fucking god

I vividly remember all the families in my church where the grade-school boys were goofing off with toys and the girls were being handed younger babies and turned into babysitters.

Boys got to be boys, but girls had to be Moms.

Really, it ‘s a serious drag that even little girls today could answer #WithoutTheWageGapIWould

(via happy-shiny-people)

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:

can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode? 

It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.

Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.

Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.

Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.

Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.

The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.

The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

(via a-windsor)

polarbear-fishbiscuits:

wannabefashionjournalist:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

To think that some people don’t see a problem with society is disturbing

it’s not just disturbing, it’s fucking scary. 

Y’all “rape culture doesn’t exist” preachers can fuck RIGHT off

(via lacigreen)

tonidorsay:

The difference between abuse & neglect and genuine love for a child that may be trans.

(via lacigreen)